iLobby connects you with other voters to resolve issues with your leaders!

iLobby® is a micro-lobbying matching service that increases the impact of your advocacy efforts. We connect you with other voters and lobbyists to resolve issues with your leaders. Put simply, this is lobbying for the little guy. (more…)

Get Money Out Of Politics Now

Money in Politics

We should get money out of politics. Everyone says it is corrosive and corrupts.

But ask any candidate who lost his last campaign if he could have used more money and I think he’ll say yes.

The problem is not too much money. The problem is narrowly focused sources of money. Narrow money doesn’t work. In plain English, narrowly focused funding sources empower special interests. (more…)

Everyone is Fed Up With Politics

iLobby – Connect, debate and engage lobbyists, PR firms and politicians. Share issues easily and change laws with iLobby. Never be left out of democracy again. (more…)

Poll vs. Debate

Why it Matters

Why is the debate structure better than a poll or a survey? Or is it?

 

 

POLL

The difference lies in a representational proxy or a democracy. With a survey or a poll only select people are included. This is usually around 1500 people. They are asked one question or perhaps several. But their answers are limited to the choices that the survey creator provides. (more…)

Two Heads are Better Than One

You Can Influence Policy

People think they can’t do it but they can.

People think they have to write legal language but they don’t.

Voters want to influence laws and policy but they don’t.

Voters think they can influence politicians by choosing the right candidate but it doesn’t always work out that way. (more…)

Politics Should be in the Fabric of Our Lives.

Politics should be in the fabric of our lives.

It should be as convenient as getting a cup of coffee and adding cream.
It should be as simple and momentary as checking the time.
It should be as insightful as glancing at the weather forecast.
It should be as involved and delightful as buying a stock.

(more…)

Why Small Business Should Lobby

Source: istockphoto

Source: istockphoto

Persuasion works.

When persuading lawmakers to simplify regulations or adopt legislation you are fighting for, as a small business you face three choices. (more…)

Hillary Supporters Stage Massive Anti-Trump Election Protests in Cities Across the Nation

Hillary Supporters Stage Massive Anti-Trump Election Protests in Cities Across the Nation

 The Wildfire is an opinion platform and any opinions or information put forth by contributors are exclusive to them and do not represent the views of IJR.

Liberals have absolutely lost it. On media, at businesses, in colleges, and now on the streets nationwide.

After being whipped up into a frenzy by a media desperate to further demonize the GOP candidate into losing to the unpopular and flawed Hillary Clinton, her supporters are not coming to grips with the prospect that America is not going to be run “the liberal way” much longer.

One of the issues is that city residents tend to be much more liberal, and there is a major disconnect with the rest of the nation, which overwhelmingly voted for the Republican Party and for Trump.

In any event, they’re not happy. In cities across the nation they are hanging Trump in effigy, burning American flags, showcasing vulgar signs [profanity warning], and cursing Donald Trump before he’s even had a day in office.

NEW YORK

Protesters marched on Trump Tower, shouting epithets like “Fuck your tower! Fuck your wall!”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A demonstrator waved an upside-down flag, which is typically reserved for military distress signals in times of grave danger.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Classic messages like the civil rights-era slogan “We shall overcome” were brought out in opposition to Trump’s victory.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

While more vulgar and direct messages were sent to the president-elect.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains profanity.) Protestors rally against Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton backers ironically couldn’t accept that Donald Trump had won, after the candidate was savaged by the liberal press for not conceding during the third presidential debate that he would necessarily accept an election defeat.

People take part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in New York City on November 9, 2016. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)Image Credit: Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images)

These protesters in New York City gathered around to burn an American flag.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Protestors burn an American flag on Fifth Avenue outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

While others hanged Donald Trump in effigy, arguably suggesting that the presidential candidate be lynched.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Ironically, there were some in attendance at the protests that made the argument that “Love Trumps Hate.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Feminist protesting was a common theme at the political demonstration, in opposition to a candidate who was accused of sexual assault and groping several women. Those charges were tried in the court of public opinion as a media-launched “October surprise” against the candidate.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains profanity) Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Women held hands and chanted in New York, some of them holding sassy references to Trump’s line, “Grab ’em by the pus*y.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some women held variations of the tea party-favorite Gadsden Flag with the new slogan, “Don’t Grab on Me.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some protesters apparently brought their babies to the wild demonstration.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

SEATTLE

In Seattle, Washington, protesters flooded the streets to express their dismay at Donald Trump’s election.

SEATTLE, WA - NOVEMBER 09: Chelsea Crispin (C) of Seattle, Washington, joins thousands of protesters marching down 2nd Avenue on November 9, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. Demostrations in multiple cities around the country were held the day following Donald Trump's upset win in last night's U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)Image Credit: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

There were screams of primal rage as liberals poured into the streets to vent their frustration.

SEATTLE, WA - NOVEMBER 09: Sasha Savenko (C) and Sydney Kane (C, Right), both students at the University of Washington, join thousands of protesters march down 2nd Avenue on November 9, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. Demostrations in multiple cities around the country were held the day following Donald Trump's upset win in last night's U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)Image Credit: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

A street-level look at the protests:

Hundreds gathered at the anti-Trump demonstration.

DENVER

In Denver, Colorado, there were peaceful protests in opposition to the Trump election.

It appears that the spates of protesting are largely in solidarity with the major U.S. protests in New York, Seattle and Chicago.

CHICAGO

Thousands of Chicagoans “shut down” the city, according to reports. Chanting on the Loop proceeded to the Trump Hotel on Wabash Ave.

The protest was so massive it significantly blocked traffic.

It was sprawled across the entire downtown area of Chicago.

Chants of “Not my president!” rang out into the autumn air.

Once again, demonstrators wielded feminist themes against the candidate.

The protesters’ march was reportedly a mile long on the Loop.

These protests were in addition to walkouts across California, mobs at numerous college campuses, and planned protests for tomorrow, such as in Baltimore.

It’s only just beginning, folks.

via Hillary Supporters Stage Massive Anti-Trump Election Protests in Cities Across the Nation

Hillary Supporters Stage Massive Anti-Trump Election Protests in Cities Across the Nation

 The Wildfire is an opinion platform and any opinions or information put forth by contributors are exclusive to them and do not represent the views of IJR.

Liberals have absolutely lost it. On media, at businesses, in colleges, and now on the streets nationwide.

After being whipped up into a frenzy by a media desperate to further demonize the GOP candidate into losing to the unpopular and flawed Hillary Clinton, her supporters are not coming to grips with the prospect that America is not going to be run “the liberal way” much longer.

One of the issues is that city residents tend to be much more liberal, and there is a major disconnect with the rest of the nation, which overwhelmingly voted for the Republican Party and for Trump.

In any event, they’re not happy. In cities across the nation they are hanging Trump in effigy, burning American flags, showcasing vulgar signs [profanity warning], and cursing Donald Trump before he’s even had a day in office.

NEW YORK

Protesters marched on Trump Tower, shouting epithets like “Fuck your tower! Fuck your wall!”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A demonstrator waved an upside-down flag, which is typically reserved for military distress signals in times of grave danger.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Classic messages like the civil rights-era slogan “We shall overcome” were brought out in opposition to Trump’s victory.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

While more vulgar and direct messages were sent to the president-elect.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains profanity.) Protestors rally against Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton backers ironically couldn’t accept that Donald Trump had won, after the candidate was savaged by the liberal press for not conceding during the third presidential debate that he would necessarily accept an election defeat.

People take part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in New York City on November 9, 2016. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)Image Credit: Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images)

These protesters in New York City gathered around to burn an American flag.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Protestors burn an American flag on Fifth Avenue outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

While others hanged Donald Trump in effigy, arguably suggesting that the presidential candidate be lynched.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Ironically, there were some in attendance at the protests that made the argument that “Love Trumps Hate.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Feminist protesting was a common theme at the political demonstration, in opposition to a candidate who was accused of sexual assault and groping several women. Those charges were tried in the court of public opinion as a media-launched “October surprise” against the candidate.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains profanity) Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Women held hands and chanted in New York, some of them holding sassy references to Trump’s line, “Grab ’em by the pus*y.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some women held variations of the tea party-favorite Gadsden Flag with the new slogan, “Don’t Grab on Me.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some protesters apparently brought their babies to the wild demonstration.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

SEATTLE

In Seattle, Washington, protesters flooded the streets to express their dismay at Donald Trump’s election.

SEATTLE, WA - NOVEMBER 09: Chelsea Crispin (C) of Seattle, Washington, joins thousands of protesters marching down 2nd Avenue on November 9, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. Demostrations in multiple cities around the country were held the day following Donald Trump's upset win in last night's U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)Image Credit: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

There were screams of primal rage as liberals poured into the streets to vent their frustration.

SEATTLE, WA - NOVEMBER 09: Sasha Savenko (C) and Sydney Kane (C, Right), both students at the University of Washington, join thousands of protesters march down 2nd Avenue on November 9, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. Demostrations in multiple cities around the country were held the day following Donald Trump's upset win in last night's U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)Image Credit: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

A street-level look at the protests:

Hundreds gathered at the anti-Trump demonstration.

DENVER

In Denver, Colorado, there were peaceful protests in opposition to the Trump election.

It appears that the spates of protesting are largely in solidarity with the major U.S. protests in New York, Seattle and Chicago.

CHICAGO

Thousands of Chicagoans “shut down” the city, according to reports. Chanting on the Loop proceeded to the Trump Hotel on Wabash Ave.

The protest was so massive it significantly blocked traffic.

It was sprawled across the entire downtown area of Chicago.

Chants of “Not my president!” rang out into the autumn air.

Once again, demonstrators wielded feminist themes against the candidate.

The protesters’ march was reportedly a mile long on the Loop.

These protests were in addition to walkouts across California, mobs at numerous college campuses, and planned protests for tomorrow, such as in Baltimore.

It’s only just beginning, folks.

via Hillary Supporters Stage Massive Anti-Trump Election Protests in Cities Across the Nation

Hillary Supporters Stage Massive Anti-Trump Election Protests in Cities Across the Nation

 The Wildfire is an opinion platform and any opinions or information put forth by contributors are exclusive to them and do not represent the views of IJR.

Liberals have absolutely lost it. On media, at businesses, in colleges, and now on the streets nationwide.

After being whipped up into a frenzy by a media desperate to further demonize the GOP candidate into losing to the unpopular and flawed Hillary Clinton, her supporters are not coming to grips with the prospect that America is not going to be run “the liberal way” much longer.

One of the issues is that city residents tend to be much more liberal, and there is a major disconnect with the rest of the nation, which overwhelmingly voted for the Republican Party and for Trump.

In any event, they’re not happy. In cities across the nation they are hanging Trump in effigy, burning American flags, showcasing vulgar signs [profanity warning], and cursing Donald Trump before he’s even had a day in office.

NEW YORK

Protesters marched on Trump Tower, shouting epithets like “Fuck your tower! Fuck your wall!”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A demonstrator waved an upside-down flag, which is typically reserved for military distress signals in times of grave danger.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Classic messages like the civil rights-era slogan “We shall overcome” were brought out in opposition to Trump’s victory.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Hundreds of protestors rallying against Donald Trump gather outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

While more vulgar and direct messages were sent to the president-elect.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains profanity.) Protestors rally against Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton backers ironically couldn’t accept that Donald Trump had won, after the candidate was savaged by the liberal press for not conceding during the third presidential debate that he would necessarily accept an election defeat.

People take part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in New York City on November 9, 2016. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)Image Credit: Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images)

These protesters in New York City gathered around to burn an American flag.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9: Protestors burn an American flag on Fifth Avenue outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

While others hanged Donald Trump in effigy, arguably suggesting that the presidential candidate be lynched.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Ironically, there were some in attendance at the protests that made the argument that “Love Trumps Hate.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Feminist protesting was a common theme at the political demonstration, in opposition to a candidate who was accused of sexual assault and groping several women. Those charges were tried in the court of public opinion as a media-launched “October surprise” against the candidate.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains profanity) Anti-Trump protesters gather in a park as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Women held hands and chanted in New York, some of them holding sassy references to Trump’s line, “Grab ’em by the pus*y.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some women held variations of the tea party-favorite Gadsden Flag with the new slogan, “Don’t Grab on Me.”

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some protesters apparently brought their babies to the wild demonstration.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 3: A group of protestors, comprised mostly of women, rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 3, 2016 in New York City. Election Day is less than a week away in the United States, where citizens will choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to become the next president. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)Image Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

SEATTLE

In Seattle, Washington, protesters flooded the streets to express their dismay at Donald Trump’s election.

SEATTLE, WA - NOVEMBER 09: Chelsea Crispin (C) of Seattle, Washington, joins thousands of protesters marching down 2nd Avenue on November 9, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. Demostrations in multiple cities around the country were held the day following Donald Trump's upset win in last night's U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)Image Credit: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

There were screams of primal rage as liberals poured into the streets to vent their frustration.

SEATTLE, WA - NOVEMBER 09: Sasha Savenko (C) and Sydney Kane (C, Right), both students at the University of Washington, join thousands of protesters march down 2nd Avenue on November 9, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. Demostrations in multiple cities around the country were held the day following Donald Trump's upset win in last night's U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)Image Credit: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

A street-level look at the protests:

Hundreds gathered at the anti-Trump demonstration.

DENVER

In Denver, Colorado, there were peaceful protests in opposition to the Trump election.

It appears that the spates of protesting are largely in solidarity with the major U.S. protests in New York, Seattle and Chicago.

CHICAGO

Thousands of Chicagoans “shut down” the city, according to reports. Chanting on the Loop proceeded to the Trump Hotel on Wabash Ave.

The protest was so massive it significantly blocked traffic.

It was sprawled across the entire downtown area of Chicago.

Chants of “Not my president!” rang out into the autumn air.

Once again, demonstrators wielded feminist themes against the candidate.

The protesters’ march was reportedly a mile long on the Loop.

These protests were in addition to walkouts across California, mobs at numerous college campuses, and planned protests for tomorrow, such as in Baltimore.

It’s only just beginning, folks.

via Hillary Supporters Stage Massive Anti-Trump Election Protests in Cities Across the Nation

 

Hillary or Trump?

Generally the people who are the least empowered are the ones who are the most agitated and in need of the answer to the big question. Are you voting for Hillary or Trump?

I was questioned and pressed by a woman yesterday who took me aside and told me Trump was the worst possible candidate and Hillary wasn’t much better. But, who will I vote for?

I told her it didn’t matter because a delegate in the Electoral College would determine the outcome. It didn’t matter how many ways I said this, she still couldn’t get over it. In the past few weeks I have encountered several other people with the same compulsive behavior and line of questioning.

Rightsidereport Trump Hillary

They have fallen prey to the myth of what Elliott Wave’s Robert Prechter calls the “omnipotent director.” They believe that one man (Superman) will save them. All I know is no one is up to the task. This kind of thinking is a projection of the “I am helpless” myth and “someone should save me” but there’s no one good enough so I should just remain a victim forever.

So what I’m saying is, people who are further away from the center of power are more likely to experience this affect and phenomena. It’s like some medical condition of the brain when as Dr. Daniel Amen says the Cingulate Gyrus can’t stop obsessing about one side of an equation and the rational frontal lobe does not interfere or help calm them down. So the prefrontal cortex stays out of the equation. They just can’t get over it.

But there is a group not bringing this up because they seem to understand the subtleties of the political system. Who are they? Well naturally they are informed, engaged and closer to the center of power, politically speaking.

They are the 1%. They are the donor class because they know what’s going on. They are not preoccupied by who the president will be six months from now. They have bets on both sides because they understand policy and are simply positioning themselves for the best outcome regardless of who is chosen.

So who is involved in this human drama on the outskirts of town? Who is constantly obsessing over how the next president is going to affect their life, take away the right to choice, take away their business and all their opportunity or make sure that they have no money left after he/she is in office?

Who are these people? Well you would think they would be the people who have something to lose but in reality they have nothing to lose. In fact the strangest thing about this is that some of these people are actually not even citizens or US registered voters. I know for a fact that some of them are green card holders who do not vote at all. Yet they are incredibly obsessed with this question and they need an answer from everyone they know right now.

And that is a problem.

The media picks up on this and shows that they are victims. Like Lilliputians on a spinning bowl shaped on lathe, as the curves of the outer extreme on the circumference are molded, these people are falling out over the edge into nothingness as it spins faster and faster.

They have the least to lose. They are the most susceptible and therefore the media focuses on them because they seem to present a good tragic story. They are falling off the spinning bowl as it goes faster and faster, and we have to help them. I think.

The least powerful are the most concerned and the least effective, yet the most powerful are the least concerned yet they are the most effective.

The key?

Get away from the edge before centrifugal force throws you off. Move toward the center and once you arrive at the center all will be still and every choice will be equidistant from you and nothing will seem extreme.

Once you’re there, you will know who to vote for. Let me know in November.

Take our free 7-day policy + challenge

 

Image Source: http://rightsidereport.com/polls/poll-trump-vs-hillary-who-would-you-vote-for

Patriot Games: The Game Plan for Getting Heard in the Political Arena (Part 1)

ManufacturingToday-iLobby-JulyAug2015

Successful manufacturers have a plan for just about any contingency. They’re thinking ahead about adopting new technology, cutting energy costs and handling health care issues. Increasingly though, one of their biggest challenges is dealing with the complex landscape of increasing regulations, politics and government. The decisions made by people in state capitals and in Washington, D.C., affect every aspect of how they do business.

Manufacturing Today article.

Manufacturing Today article.

Spending millions on lobbyists is one tactic to deal with this complexity — though not always a successful one, as demonstrated by the recent Comcast-Time Warner debacle. The alternative is for company leaders to engage in some tough evaluation and creative thinking about how to get through the political noise. They need new strategies to promote their priorities and get the politicians and policy decision-makers on their side.

Politics permeates everything

Increasingly, working the political angles is just part of doing business. Companies find politics comes into play early and often, whether they need a local permit for storm drainage or in directing major federal action on immigration reform.

According to the National Manufacturers Association, top issues for manufacturers include energy, health care, infrastructure, regulatory reform, taxes, trade and immigration. Naturally, issues that directly affect a company’s operations—its costs, profits, expansion plans and employment outlook—are of utmost concern to any company. Yet it can be difficult to communicate the urgency of these issues to decision-makers, let alone persuade them to share the same priorities.

Why is it so hard to work on political issues and actually accomplish anything? Everyone laments “partisan gridlock,” each party blaming the other for it. But that’s only part of the reason so little gets done. The political process has become so complicated that it is inscrutable even to government staffers. That helps keep lobbyists in business, according to author Lee Drutman, who notes that sometimes they seem to be the only ones who understand what’s been proposed and adopted. But it certainly doesn’t help ordinary citizens who are trying to run their companies and promote their interests.

Drutman outlines the scope of the problem in his book, “The Business of America Is Lobbying: How Corporation Became Politicized and Politics Became More Corporate” (Oxford University Press, 2015). He notes that with the proliferation of clashing interests, it’s harder to change the status quo. And when legislation does pass, it tends to be extremely complex, reflecting all the bargains and tradeoffs that had to be made in the process. As an example, think of the Affordable Care Act and its regulations, one version of which contained at least 10,000 pages, according to the Washington Post.

Writes Drutman, “The policy process is neither a vending machine nor an auction … Politics is far messier, and far more interesting than such simplistic models might suggest. And almost certainly, the increased competition for political outcomes has made it even more unpredictable.”

As an illustration, look at the efficiency of the 113th Congress. According to Govtrack.us, over the last two years, it has seen about 10,000 active bills, only about three percent of which were passed. It’s probably no coincidence that Gallup reports that Americans’ approval rating for Congress has ranged between 12 percent and 15 percent in the early part of this year.

The struggle for traction

Why do even some of the most well-funded issue campaigns fail to gain traction with lawmakers? There are several possible reasons.

  • A proposal might be important to only a select few — by definition, a “special interest” issue.
  • There are funding issues and concerns. Worthy bills and programs often die in the Appropriations Committee because there’s no revenue stream to cover them.
  • They lack a groundswell of popular support. In this case, a proposal might not generate the kind of enthusiasm that produces a lot of legislative co-sponsors. That means fewer voices argue for passage.
  • Legislators like to see benefits for their particular constituents. If they do not, they’re less inclined to go to bat for a given issue or pay it much attention.

Interestingly, in the proposed Comcast merger with Time Warner, there seemed to be no constituency urging approval aside from Comcast itself. According to The New York Times (April 24, 2015), the deal collapsed as it became clear that federal regulators were ready to block it. This occurred in spite of Comcast’s $5.9 million in campaign contributions during the 2014 elections and $25 million expenditures lavished on lobbyists.

Moving the political process forward

Tough scrutiny is called for as companies evaluate the realistic chances for getting action on their political priorities. Manufacturers need to realize that in a sense they’re competing for a limited resource in the form of a legislator’s time and attention. In addition, they are often up against other issues that are more inherently compelling. In California, for instance, two of the hottest political debates concern a Senate bill to require immunizing schoolchildren to prevent the spread of measles, and another one enabling “death with dignity.” Public safety, children’s health, religious freedom, individual suffering, right to life … issues like these naturally capture the attention of the general population as well as numerous interest groups.

To get involved with the political process in a meaningful way, start by following some basic guidelines:

  • Don’t have a long to-do list. Focus on just a couple of high-priority issues on which you want public officials to take action.
  • Look for likely sponsors and people who will support the company’s or industry’s issues. Scrutinize any bills that are similar as well as those that might compete with it.
  • Consider the funding that will be needed to promote specific legislation, as well as possible opportunities for favorable mentions in the media.
  • Remember that imagery is important. Frame the issue so that it taps into a universal value (e.g. security, safety). Can it be reframed so a negative idea (drones are scary) becomes a positive one (drones are useful and helpful)?
  • Understand that it’s easier to block an idea or proposal than it is to get one passed.

Another fact of life in politics is that lawmakers looking toward the next election want evidence that there is real benefit to their constituents if they support a certain issue or real harm to constituents if they oppose it. Think of the urgency that helped promote the health care reform law despite zero support from one side of the aisle. “Forty million Americans have no health insurance!”

The public relations angle

Manufacturers often fail to generate support for their issues with messages that resonate with the public. Also, they often fail to reach into their rank-and-file workforce for support that could effectively bolster their issues with lawmakers.

The debate over Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) is a good example of an issue that both sides have tried to frame using an issue of importance to lawmakers and their constituents: jobs. It was either job-creating legislation or job-killing legislation, depending on which side of the argument one favored.

Companies must work with their employees, supporters and advocates to create frameworks and fresh narratives to propel their priorities forward.

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